--- aliases: [] --- #business #startup # [[Epistemic status]] #shower-thought #to-digest # Changelog ```dataview TABLE WITHOUT ID file.mtime AS "Last Modified" FROM [[#]] SORT file.mtime DESC LIMIT 3 ``` # Related [[Fitzpatrick, Rob - The Mom Test - How to Talk to Customers Learn if Your Business Is a Good Idea When Everyone Is Lying to You]] # TODO > [!TODO] TODO # Customer interview >Once we’ve explored the opportunities that matter most to the customer, we can dive into the specifics of any of those opportunities. You may have specific opportunities in mind, but you’ll want to let your participant set the direction of the interview. Remember, what matters most to your customer trumps what you need to learn. >The key to interviewing well is to distinguish what you are trying to learn (your research questions) from what you ask in the interview (your interview questions). >If you want to build a successful product, you need to understand your customers’ actual behavior—their reality—not the story they tell themselves. >You can’t simply ask your customers about their behavior and expect to get an accurate answer. Most will obligingly give you what sounds like a reasonable answer. But you won’t know if they are telling you about their ideal behavior or their actual behavior. Nor will you know if they are simply telling you a coherent story that sounds true but isn’t true in practice. i.e., [[The Map is not the Territory]] >This is exactly why in Thinking, Fast and Slow, behavioral economist Daniel Kahneman claimed, “A remarkable aspect of your mental life is that you are rarely stumped.” Your brain will gladly give you an answer. That answer, however, may not be grounded in reality. In fact, Kahneman outlines dozens of ways our brains get it wrong. It’s also why Kahneman argues confidence isn’t a good indicator of truth or reality. He writes, “Confidence is a feeling, which reflects the coherence of the information and the cognitive ease of processing it.” Not necessarily the truth. >~ [[Teresa Torres]]